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20 October 2015

Evidence handbook for nonprofits, telling a value story, and Twitter makes you better.

1. Useful evidence → Nonprofit impact → Social good For their upcoming handbook, the UK's Alliance for Useful Evidence (@A4UEvidence) is seeking "case studies of when, why, and how charities have used research evidence and what the impact was for them." Share your stories here.

2. Data story → Value story → Engaged audience On Evidence Soup, Tracy Altman explains the importance of telling a value story, not a data story - and shares five steps to communicating a powerful message with data.

3. Sports analytics → Baseball preparedness → #Winning Excellent performance Thursday night by baseball's big data-pitcher: Zach Greinke. (But there's also this: Cubs vs. Mets!)

4. Diverse network → More exposure → New ideas "New research suggests that employees with a diverse Twitter network — one that exposes them to people and ideas they don’t already know — tend to generate better ideas." Parise et al. describe their analysis of social networks in the MIT Sloan Management magazine. (Thanks to @mluebbecke, who shared this with a reminder that 'correlation is not causation'. Amen.)

5. War on drugs → Less tax revenue → Cost to society The Democratic debate was a reminder that the U.S. War on Drugs was a very unfortunate waste - and that many prison sentences for nonviolent drug crimes impose unacceptable costs on the convict and society. Consider this evidence from the Cato Institute (@CatoInstitute).

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