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07 April 2016

Better evidence for patients, and geeking out on baseball.

Health tech wearables

1. SPOTLIGHT: Redefining how patients get health evidence.

How can people truly understand evidence and the tradeoffs associated with health treatments? How can the medical community lead them through decision-making that's shared - but also evidence-based?

Hoping for cures, patients and their families anxiously Google medical research. Meanwhile, the quantified selves are gathering data at breakneck speed. These won't solve the problem. However, this month's entire Health Affairs issue (April 2016) focuses on consumer uses of evidence and highlights promising ideas.

  • Translating medical evidence. Lots of synthesis and many guidelines are targeted at healthcare professionals, not civilians. Knowledge translation has become an essential piece, although it doesn't always involve patients at early stages. The Boot Camp Translation process is changing that. The method enables leaders to engage patients and develop healthcare language that is accessible and understandable. Topics include colon cancer, asthma, and blood pressure management.
  • Truly patient-centered medicine. Patient engagement is a buzzword, but capturing patient-reported outcomes in the clinical environment is a real thing that might make a big difference. Danielle Lavallee led an investigation into how patients and providers can find more common ground for communicating.
  • Meaningful insight from wearables. These are early days, so it's probably not fair to take shots at the gizmos out there. It will be a beautiful thing when sensors and other devices can deliver more than alerts and reports - and make valuable recommendations in a consumable way. And of course these wearables can play a role in routine collection of patient-reported outcomes.


Statcast

2. Roll your own analytics for fantasy baseball.
For some of us, it's that special time of year when we come to the realization that our favorite baseball team is likely going home early again this season. There's always fantasy baseball, and it's getting easier to geek out with analytics to improve your results.

3. AI engine emerges after 30 years.
No one ever said machine learning was easy. Cyc is an AI engine that reflects 30 years of building a knowledge base. Now its creator, Doug Lenat, says it's ready for prime time. Lucid is commercializing the technology. Personal assistants and healthcare applications are in the works.

Photo credit: fitbit one by Tatsuo Yamashita on Flickr.

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